The corporate logo of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is shown in Silver Spring, Maryland, November 4, 2009. U.S. health officials unveiled plans to fight avoidable injuries from medication errors or misuse, a problem that harms hundreds of thousands of people each year and can be deadly.    REUTERS/Jason Reed   (UNITED STATES HEALTH) - RTXQCTX

EMA AND FDA MARKETING AUTHORIZATIONS: CONCORDANCES AND DISCORDANCES

EMA and FDA have published in joint an article entitled “A comparison of EMA and FDA decisions for new drug marketing applications 2014-2016: concordance, discordance and why”. Most of information were sourced from EMA´s European Public Assessment Reports (EPARs) and FDA reviews. The study consisted of comparing decisions on 107 new medicine applications at the EMA and FDA between 2014 and 2016.

The result of the analysis is the EMA and FDA alignment in more than 90% of marketing authorization decisions for new medicines. The most common reasons for discordance were differences in conclusions about efficacy and differences in clinical data submitted in support of an application.

For more information: EMA/FDA analysis shows high degree of alignment in marketing application decisions between EU and US

20190130_2

GUIDANCE ON ONCOLOGY ENDPOINTS: FDA REVISION

Clinical trial endpoints serve to different objectives: In early phase, clinical trials evaluate safety and evidence biological drug activity; for later phase efficacy studies evaluate the clinical benefit.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has revised the previous guidance on oncology endpoints published in May 2007. This guidance provides recommendations to applicants on endpoints for cancer clinical trials submitted to the FDA.

In this guidance, the FDA classifies several endpoints in base on type of endpoint and study design. Furthermore, analyses advantages and disadvantages of every endpoint referred.

In addition to the already stablished endpoints, in this revision, the FDA proposes two new endpoints to consider:

  • Blood or Body Fluid-Based Biomarkers: Generally, although biomarkers assayed from blood or body fluids have not served as primary endpoints for cancer drug approval, the FDA has accepted blood-based markers as elements of a composite endpoint. This fact has been due to the use of paraprotein levels measured in blood and urine (myeloma) or CA-125 (ovarian cancer), for example.
  •  Emerging Endpoints: FDA recognizes that owing to advances in science, new endpoints that may be used in drug approvals can be identified. As examples, minimal residual disease (lymphoblastic leukemia) and metastasis-free survival (non-metastasis castration-resistant prostate cancer).

 

For more information: https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/UCM071590.pdf